Reading Wisely

Reading Wisely

Ini dia hari pertama petualangan menaklukan Advanced English Vocabulary dari buku 1100 Words nya Murray Bromberg, Baron Educational Series.

Sumber Bacaan

1st Week – 1st Day

A youngster who reads voraciously, though indiscriminately, does not necessarily gain wisdom over teenagers who are more selective in their reading choices. A young man who has read the life story of every eminent athlete of the twentieth century, or a coed who has steeped herself in every social-protest novel she can get her hand on, may very well be learning all there is to know in a very limited area. But books are replete with many wonders that it is often discouraging to see bright young people limit their own experiences.

Sumber: Murray Bromberg, 1100 Words You Need to Know

Voracious

The word voracious means having an insatiable appetite or desire for something. It can describe a person who has an intense craving for food, knowledge, or other things and is willing to go to great lengths to satisfy that craving.

For example, someone voracious for knowledge might constantly seek new information and experiences and be unable to get enough of it. Similarly, someone who is voracious for food might eat constantly and be unable to stop themselves from consuming large quantities of food.

The word voracious can also be used more generally to describe someone or something eager or greedy in their pursuit of something. For example, a voracious investor might constantly seek new opportunities to invest their money, or a voracious reader might devour books at an alarming rate.

In summary, voracious means having an insatiable appetite or desire for something and can be used to describe someone or something eager or greedy in their pursuit of it.

Though

The word “though” is a conjunction in the English language. It is used to introduce a clause that provides a contrast or exception to the clause that comes before it.

For example:

“I would love to go to the beach today, though it’s supposed to rain all day.”

“I’m not feeling well, though I’m not sure what’s wrong.”

In the first example, the clause “though it’s supposed to rain all day” contrasts the clause “I would love to go to the beach today,” implying that the speaker still wants to go to the beach despite the bad weather. In the second example, the clause “though I’m not sure what’s wrong” provides an exception to the clause “I’m not feeling well,” implying that the speaker is unsure of the cause of their illness.

In addition to being used as a conjunction, “though” can also be used as an adverb, meaning “however” or “nevertheless.” For example:

“I’m tired, though I’ll try to stay awake.”

“The project was difficult, though we were able to complete it on time.”

In these examples, “though” is used to introduce a clause that provides a contrast or exception to the clause that comes before it, similar to its use as a conjunction.

In summary, “though” is a conjunction used to introduce a clause that provides a contrast or exception to the clause that comes before it. It can also be used as an adverb with a similar meaning.

Indiscriminate

Indiscriminate means lacking discrimination or judgment or treating all things or people the same way without considering their differences or qualities. It can describe actions or decisions that are not carefully thought out or do not consider the specific circumstances or characteristics of the people or things involved.

For example, an indiscriminate decision might be made without considering the potential consequences or the specific needs of the people involved. An indiscriminate attack might target anyone or anything in the area without considering who or what is being harmed.

Indiscriminate can also be used to describe someone who is careless or thoughtless in their actions or decisions and does not take the time to consider the consequences of their choices.

In summary, indiscriminate means lacking discrimination or judgment and can be used to describe actions or decisions that do not take into account the specific circumstances or characteristics of the people or things involved.

Eminent

The word eminent means notable, important, or distinguished. It can describe a highly respected or influential person in their field or who has achieved a high level of distinction or success.

For example, an eminent scientist might have made significant contributions to their field and is widely recognized as a leading authority in their area of research. An eminent musician might have achieved high fame and success in the music industry.

Eminent can also describe important or noteworthy things, such as an eminent event or an eminent piece of legislation. In these cases, the word implies that the thing in question is significant or noteworthy for some reason.

In summary, eminent means notable, important, or distinguished and can be used to describe a person or thing that is highly respected or influential in their field or has achieved a high level of distinction or success.

Coed

The word coed is short for “coeducational,” It refers to a school or other educational institution that is open to both male and female students. A coed school does not have separate facilities or programs for male and female students, which allows both genders to participate in the same classes and activities.

Coed schools are common in many countries and are often seen as promoting equality and inclusivity by giving all students the same opportunities to learn and participate.

The term coed can also be used more generally to describe any situation or activity involving male and female participants. For example, a coed sports team would include both male and female players, and a coed social event might be open to people of all genders.

In summary, coed refers to a school or other educational institution that is open to both male and female students or to any situation or activity that involves both male and female participants.

Steep

The word steep can have many different meanings depending on the context in which it is used. Some common definitions of the word are:

Sloping sharply: Something steep has a steep slope or incline, meaning it rises or falls at a sharp angle. For example, a steep hill or mountain would be difficult to climb.

High in price or demand: Something steep in price is very expensive, while something steep in demand is in high demand and difficult to obtain. For example, a steeply-priced ticket would be very expensive, while a product that is steeply in demand might be difficult to find or purchase.

Intense or extreme: Something that is steep can be intense or extreme. For example, a steep learning curve would require a lot of effort or concentration to overcome, while a steep drop in temperature might be a sudden and extreme change.

In summary, steep can have several different meanings depending on the context in which it is used, including having a steep slope or incline, high in price or demand, or intense or extreme.

Steeped

The word steeped can describe something soaked or saturated in a liquid, typically as part of a process or for a specific purpose.

For example, tea often steeps tea leaves in hot water, and coffee is made in hot water. In these cases, the tea leaves or coffee grounds are placed in a container to soak in hot water for a certain amount of time, allowing the flavors and other properties of the leaves or grounds to be extracted into the water.

Steeped can also be used to describe something that has been soaked or saturated in a particular atmosphere or environment. For example, a person steeped in a particular culture might have been immersed in that culture for a long time and deeply understood its customs and traditions.

In summary, steeped means soaked or saturated in a liquid or other substance, typically as part of a process or for a specific purpose.

Replete

The word “replete” is used to describe something fully or to overflow, often in a way that is satisfying or complete. It can be used to describe a person, place, or thing. For example, someone who has eaten a large meal and feels satisfied and full might be described as being “replete.” A room that is filled with a large number of objects or people might be described as being “replete.” A book that contains a wealth of information on a particular subject might be described as being “replete.” Replete is generally seen as a positive quality, as it indicates that something has been filled or supplied to the point of satisfaction or completion.

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